Pet Dental Care is The Basis For Long-Term Health

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Even with bad breath and yellowed teeth, your pet still seems to eat, drink, and play as normal. Is it really necessary for them to have their teeth cleaned? Due to the high volume of patients that visit Texoma Veterinary Hospital with oral issues, we can safely say “yes.” Pet dental care is necessary for your companion to live a long and healthy life, and our team is highly knowledgeable in the latest veterinary dental practices.

Pet Dental Care in Sherman: Veterinarian Gives Dog Teeth Cleaning

Signs of Dental Disease

Despite increased awareness of dental disease, the condition itself is more prevalent than ever among dogs and cats. A continuous lack of dental care is all it takes for dental disease to develop. The primary indicators of this disease are:

  • Red, swollen, receding gums
  • Brown/yellow teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Bad breath
  • Difficulty chewing/eating
  • Decreased appetite
  • Heavy drooling
  • Swelling under the eyes
  • Less interest in chew toys
  • Sleeping more often

Severe dental disease can result in heart, liver, and kidney disease in your pet, which is why dental disease prevention is so important. Contact us today so we can help!

How to Prevent Dental Disease and Other Oral Health Problems

Gingivitis, cavities, and dental disease can be prevented if your pet receives proper dental care on a routine basis. Starting them young is especially important, as they will quickly get used to having their mouths handled and will be more receptive to brushing.

If we examine your pet and see that they are showing signs of dental disease, we will need to take further action, which may include:

  • Bloodwork to make sure that your pet is healthy so we can safely sedate them for their dental procedure
  • Digital, full-mouth X-rays to examine your pet’s teeth and look for signs of damage below the gum line
  • A complete cleaning performed with your pet under anesthesia that includes scaling the teeth to remove plaque and tartar, polishing the enamel surfaces smooth, and performing any extractions as needed to remove broken and/or infected teeth

What if My Pet Doesn’t Tolerate Brushing?

It isn't always possible for some owners to brush their pet's teeth. To compensate for lack of brushing, we recommend a tartar-control diet to minimize plaque and tartar buildup, dental chews and treats, and using a finger brush or wipe to remove excess buildup from your pet’s teeth. Additionally, they might need to see us for dental cleanings at least once a year to keep dental disease at bay.

If your pet has bad breath or is showing other signs of a dental problem, don’t wait—let us know by calling (903) 868-9434 today!

Pet Dental Care in Sherman: Cat Receives Dental X-Ray
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